Survey Shows Three-quarters Of Global Parents To Consider Studying Abroad

HSBC recently released its latest survey, Learning for Life, covering 5,500 parents in 16 countries around the world, showing that 77% would consider sending their child to study abroad either for undergraduate or postgraduate studies.
The latest installment of HSBC’s The Value of Education research series, Learning for Life is based on a comprehensive national survey of parents around the world who have at least one child aged 23 years old or younger. It was conducted online by Ipsos MORI in March and April 2015 (with supplemental in-person interviews in the UAE).
The 16 countries sample included countries popular for sending students abroad like Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico and Turkey. Research showed that close to two thirds (64%) of parents would consider study abroad for their children’s undergraduate studies, with an even higher majority (70%) considering postgraduate study.

parents and students

(Source: http://stacyloliver.com/)

The report affirms that globally, parents in Asia are most receptive to send their child abroad for undergraduate study. Malaysia leads the way with four out of five parents (80%) open to the idea, followed by Hong Kong, Indonesia and Singapore at 74%. Expectedly, only around half of parents in western countries – Canada (51%), Australia (52%) and France (53%) – would consider sending their child to study abroad.

The survey also highlighted a number of key countries as probably hotspots for postgraduate demand – 88% of parents in India, followed by Turkey (83%), China and Malaysia (82%) lead the countries for those most likely to consider overseas postgraduate studies for their children.

Interestingly, nearly eight in ten (78%) parents believed their children’s prospect for becoming more knowledge as a strong benefit of a university education. Moreover, half of these parents believed their children has more opportunity today to study abroad as compared to their own generation, a promising trend on the increasing importance of higher education. Over half (51%) also saw studying abroad as a beneficial opportunity for their children to experience life and cultures abroad.

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UK Government Shove Work Rights For Non-EU Further Education Students

This week the British government tabled new rules that will no longer allow non-EU further education (FE) students currently pursuing their studies in the UK to work part-time. Non-EU FE students – those enrolled in non-degree post-secondary programs – will now also be required to leave the country upon completion of their studies and must apply for a work visa from outside the UK.

immigrants in London

(Source: www.dailymail.co.uk)

The Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules was tabled by UK’s Home Secretary, Theresa May in the British House of Commons earlier this week on 13th July 2015. James Brokenshire, UK’s Minister of Immigration made a statement to the House stating the reason behind the reform to the student visa system is to reduce net migration and tackle abuse of those that use the visa as a backdoor to the country’s job market.

Some of the key policies that were confirmed and tabled this week include:
– Effective 3rd August 2015, new non-EU students enrolled at public English FE colleges will not be allowed to work for up to 10 hours per week (or full-time between semesters)
– From 12th November 2015, FE students can only apply for work visa at the conclusion of their studies outside of the country (UK), meaning they must leave the country first
– Also commencing from 12th November 2015, FE visas will be reduced to two years from its current three. FE students are also not allowed to extend their visas unless they can showcase good progress in their studies and unless their institution is affiliated with a university.

The reforms on the student visa system were initially brought forth last week by two government ministers, which was subsequently reported in the British media over the weekend. It was initially understood that the reforms would apply to all non-EU students in the UK; however, official statements this week confirm confining the impact to students only enrolled in FE programs. Read more

Asia – The Next Superpower Of Higher Education?

chenese graduates
(Source: www.askbennychinese.com)

In the world of higher education, there has been much discourse and claims of a shifting global movement gravitated towards Asia. Indeed, it is not unusual to also hear and read about the region’s profound transformation and rise over the past half-century since the 70s to the present day.

Asia has undergone unprecedented economic growth over the last few decades resulting in driving major social and demographic change as well as institutional reform. In some countries, for the most part, this has brought about greater stability, infrastructure and more sound policies and regulations. The rise of a large and growing middle class together with increased openness, market reforms and regional initiatives such as ASEAN to unite and increase its global competitiveness has brought about greater interconnectedness amongst Asian countries and the rest of the world.

The higher education sector in the region has also reflected these dynamics, which is no surprise considering the economic boom in many fast-growing Asian countries is linked to a knowledge-based economy – knowledge production, advanced skills and an overall rising demand for higher education. In fact, it is estimated that by 2020, China alone will account for 30% of the world’s university graduates aged between 25 to 34 years old. Asia’s third largest economy, India is also projected to add 300 million people to the workforce in the next 2 decades – that, by the way, is the equivalent size of the entire population of the United States. On top of these big players, let’s not forget hot emerging countries that have undergone strong transformation or are part of the global competition and experienced rapid economic growth and taken steps to internationalize their higher education institutions, such as Malaysia, Vietnam and Thailand. Let’s look at the higher education landscape in Asia from the view of international engagement between Asian countries versus the rest of the world as well as domestic higher education developments of Asian countries.

A recent Open Doors 2014 statistics show a clear pattern that affirms the surge in mobility out of Asia, as well as into Asia. Delving deeper, we see many Asian faculty who return to leadership positions in their countries having obtained their PhDs from either US or European universities. On top of that, there is an increasingly growing segment of post-secondary students in Asia that plan to study abroad, likely in the US, Australia or Europe. This isn’t surprising. Consider this – Asian students make up a whopping 64% of the total international student body in the US. What does all this mean for Asia’s higher education landscape? Read more

Outdated & Ageing Leaders Holding Back Private Varsities In Malaysia?

Ministry of higher education Malaysia

(Source: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/)

Currently, only about 15% of Vice-Chancellors and 8% of Deputies have significant and relevant overseas management experience

A new study conducted by The Penang Institute analyzing the latest data from 2013 by Malaysia’s Ministry of Education found that poor leadership from the top management may be the cause of financial pressure and poor overall quality outcomes seen at private institutions in Malaysia.

The research examined publicly-available data and studied the diversity of top management teams in Malaysia’s private higher education institutions (HEIs) and found them to share disproportionately high similarities in terms of background, demographics and experience.

Penang Institute General Manager and Serdang MP, Ong Kian Ming stated that “[the] data showed that around 90% of Malaysian Vice-Chancellors were men and only 20% of their Deputy Vice-Chancellors were women.” Age was also highly concentrated – 56% of Vice-Chancellors aged sixty years old & 32% in their fifties – showing close to nine out of 10 being aged in their fifties and above. What is even more worrying is that, the next generation were also close to the end of their careers. Almost half (47%) of Deputy Vice-Chancellors were in their sixties with 34% in their fifties. Read more

Higher Jobless Rate Among Private Varsity Graduates In Malaysia A Rising Concern

Hire me

(Source: nickgrantham.com)

The Penang Institute analyzed the latest data from 2013 by Malaysia’s Ministry of Education and it shows a very worrying trend: Almost a third (27%) of private sector graduates remain unemployed six months after graduation – compared to 24% among their public sector counterparts. The latest unemployment rates from the Department of Statistics Malaysia for 2015 was a solid 3.1% showing full employment. So, what’s happening? More importantly, why are Malaysian graduates, in general, not able to gain full employment?

The Institute raised this issue following the release of the Education Blueprint by Malaysia’s Ministry of Education, which seemed to focus largely only on public higher education institutions. Penang Institute General Manager & Serdang MP, Ong Kian Ming said that the lack of focus on private institutions by the government is worrisome. He added:

“The fact that the private higher education sector was largely ignored is a serious omission given that almost half of the total enrollment in post-secondary education is in private universities.”

The Institute also found other publicly-available data which spells a dismal outlook: Private universities only have 13.3# of academics with PhD qualifications versus 33.4% in public varsities – that is more than 2.5 times more academically-qualified faculty in public institutions. For private universities, close to 77% had only a Bachelor’s and Master’s while 10.5% had shockingly lower than a Bachelor’s qualification.

Based on the latest SETARA ratings – rating exercise conducted by Malaysia’s Ministry of Education – public varsities outperformed private universities with 81% of its universities rated “Excellent” as compared to only 51% of private universities. Furthermore, a third of private universities received no ratings at all.

Private institutions in Malaysia need to take a long and serious look at what this study means – the implications and worrying trends – in terms of having a mismatch of how its students are being educated versus what is needed in the real-world market. The study seems to show a growing disparity highlighting the lack of employability of graduates from private HEIs.

It is clear that this problem cannot be fixed overnight and would require concerted effort by private universities to study and assess its quality of education to bridge this widening gap. This would include not only looking at the qualifications and quality of its faculty, but taking on an eagle-overview of its entire process – talent, standards, processes, system, etc. Failure to do this alongside taking real, practical and serious steps to improve its quality of education may prove to hurt these private HEIs in the mid to long term as potential students become more savvy and wary to consider studying at a private institution.