Education Market Update 2018: Insights to Why International Students Choose Australia

Australia’s 3rd largest export is currently international education. In 2016-2017, it is recorded that international education is worth 28.6 billion to the Australian economy. This is the main reason why Australia has been using their efforts to continually improve and increase their student numbers and this effort has played a significant impact in student’s perception in choosing Australia as their number one destination to study overseas. Based on a recent survey (the International Student Survey 2016 published by the Australian Government Department of Education and Training) presented by Australia High Commission, there are 5 areas in satisfaction, reputation, multi-international students, and levels of study that has reported positive insights in their industry. 

 

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1. Satisfaction
Based on a tertiary student experience survey conducted in 2016, there was an overall 89% satisfaction rate from the students who have arrived in Australia. In addition to living, learn, and support satisfaction in which students find most important upon having a first impression and lasting impression of during their stay in Australia.
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2. Reputation
Australia is still the number one choice  of overseas studies (based on 74% of respondents) among international students and this is due to the reputation of four factors:
  • Qualification
  • Education system
  • Research
  • Higher Education Provider
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3. Multi International Students
When it comes to student numbers, 2017 has increased by 13%. It is found that China, India, Nepal, Malaysia, and Brazil are the top countries that sent students to Australia. In regards to the rest, a total of 642,001 students represent 194 nationalities. Majority of the student enrollment is still in the Higher Education sector based on the 799,371 enrollments.
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4. More Masters and Diplomas
In terms of latest numbers and rends, 2017 has indeed increased in higher education and as well as a huge jump of 106% in the VET sector. Bachelors degree level has decreased in 2017, while as Masters and diploma levels has increased compared to 2016. In a summary, Australia is still the high quality Higher Education provider for the international market.

Study tracks the increasing popularity of alternate credentials

One in four higher education institutions in North America now offer badges and three in four say that such alternate credentials are “strategically important to their future.” These are some of the headline findings of a new study from Pearson and UPCEA.

Percentage of UPCEA/Pearson survey respondents offering various types of alternate credentials, 2016 and 2017. Source: UPCEA

Percentage of UPCEA/Pearson survey respondents offering various types of alternate credentials, 2016 and 2017. Source: UPCEA

The study tracks the growing footprint of alternative credentials – which are defined as “something other than the associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree” – in the professional, continuing, and online education offerings of North American universities and colleges.

“Perhaps it’s time to see if there are different ways to prepare contemporary students for an increasingly complex knowledge and information economy, using methods that take less time, cost less money, and lead more directly to quality employment,” says UPCEA President Wayne Smutz. “At least some employers are beginning to think this might be the case, as they express frustration over not being able to find qualified employees for their vacant jobs. It is this possibility to improve the way we prepare students that drives the increasing exploration of alternative credentials, such as certificates [and] badges.”

Continue reading on ICEF Monitor.

Are you paying enough attention to Instagram?

Most recruiters have learned to make good use of social channels to reach and engage prospective students. But social is a pretty fluid space, and the popularity of individual platforms shifts regularly. Yesterday’s must-attend online spaces can sometimes feel a bit too “yesterday,” and the rules of engagement between brands and students are often in flux as well.

Instagram user base by country as of April 2018. Source: Instagram, Statista

Instagram user base by country as of April 2018. Source: Instagram, Statista

For marketers, this means that social media strategies need regular tune-ups to keep pace with fast-moving and mobile audiences. And these days there is no better example of this than Instagram, a photo and video-sharing service that was first launched in 2010 and subsequently acquired by Facebook in 2012.

In the years since, all Instagram has done is grow – and explosively at that. By late 2017, the service was reporting a base of 800 million registered users and an astonishing 500 million daily users.

Growth over the last two years has been especially dramatic – with the user base growing from 500 million in June 2016 to 800 million just over a year later – and this has put the platform squarely on the radar of recruitment marketers.

Continue reading on ICEF Monitor.

Study reveals shifting motivations for language travel and changes in how students book courses

A new study published by the International Association of Language Centres (IALC) shows that students are increasingly interested in acquiring a new language to support their academic goals, though personal reasons – such as an interest in travel or desire to learn – remain the primary motivations for language study travel.

Patrik Pavlacic, head of research at StudentMarketing, presented key findings from the 2018 research report at IALC’s annual conference in Bologna.

Patrik Pavlacic, head of research at StudentMarketing, presented key findings from the 2018 research report at IALC’s annual conference in Bologna.

The IALC 2018 Research Report, Perfecting the Student Experience, is based on an online survey conducted among more than 4,700 students in 136 countries between January and March of 2017 and focused on the “pre-arrival phase of the study abroad journey.” It follows an earlier report in the series that “enumerated and quantified student preferences, experiences and, ultimately, satisfaction.”

The 2018 study respondents were former or current students of IALC schools around the world. Of the nine languages offered by IALC schools, English was the preferred language of study (46%), followed by German (19%) and Spanish (15%).

Students aged 18–24 composed the largest segment of respondents (37%), with 25–34-year-olds next (29%), followed by students aged 55+ (12%) and juniors aged 17 or younger (3%).

Continue reading on ICEF Monitor.

Parents a key player in offspring studying abroad

Parents are a key player in influencing their offspring to study abroad, according to a worldwide survey to get inside the applicant’s mind and understand the study abroad decision-making process.

More than 8,500 postgraduate and undergraduate students planning to go abroad for a programme primarily taught in English were surveyed by the i-graduate International Insight Group and the TOEFL® and GRE® Programs.

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The findings were shared with higher education international marketing and recruitment professionals attending the Studyportals ‘Embracing Change’ Academy, held in Amsterdam last week.

The session was led by María Victoria Calabrese, academic and government relations director at ETS Global, which administers and scores over 50 million English-language tests in 180 countries, including the TOEFL test.

Calabrese said while the survey showed most students claimed it was their decision to study abroad, many openly admitted their parents greatly influenced their move to enrol in another country.

Continue reading on University World News.

What makes a real international university ranking?

Around the world university rectors, presidents and managers are bracing themselves for the next wave of classifications called, rightly or wrongly, ‘rankings’. But before the new ranking wave rolls in, we should ask what makes a real international university ranking?

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The first international university ranking was produced by Asiaweek in 1999 and 2000, to be followed in 2003 by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU). The Webometrics Ranking and the Times Higher Education – Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings both started in 2004. Since then, international university rankings have proliferated.

The IREG Observatory on Academic Ranking and Excellence, whose mission is ‘to act as a repository of information about rankings and to keep track of the constantly evolving and diverse world of rankings’, commissioned the Perspektywy Education Foundation (Poland) to prepare a comprehensive IREG Inventory on International Rankings that would serve stakeholders such as students, faculty, administrators and policy-makers.

Continue reading on University World News.