Survey Shows Three-quarters Of Global Parents To Consider Studying Abroad

HSBC recently released its latest survey, Learning for Life, covering 5,500 parents in 16 countries around the world, showing that 77% would consider sending their child to study abroad either for undergraduate or postgraduate studies.
The latest installment of HSBC’s The Value of Education research series, Learning for Life is based on a comprehensive national survey of parents around the world who have at least one child aged 23 years old or younger. It was conducted online by Ipsos MORI in March and April 2015 (with supplemental in-person interviews in the UAE).
The 16 countries sample included countries popular for sending students abroad like Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico and Turkey. Research showed that close to two thirds (64%) of parents would consider study abroad for their children’s undergraduate studies, with an even higher majority (70%) considering postgraduate study.

parents and students

(Source: http://stacyloliver.com/)

The report affirms that globally, parents in Asia are most receptive to send their child abroad for undergraduate study. Malaysia leads the way with four out of five parents (80%) open to the idea, followed by Hong Kong, Indonesia and Singapore at 74%. Expectedly, only around half of parents in western countries – Canada (51%), Australia (52%) and France (53%) – would consider sending their child to study abroad.

The survey also highlighted a number of key countries as probably hotspots for postgraduate demand – 88% of parents in India, followed by Turkey (83%), China and Malaysia (82%) lead the countries for those most likely to consider overseas postgraduate studies for their children.

Interestingly, nearly eight in ten (78%) parents believed their children’s prospect for becoming more knowledge as a strong benefit of a university education. Moreover, half of these parents believed their children has more opportunity today to study abroad as compared to their own generation, a promising trend on the increasing importance of higher education. Over half (51%) also saw studying abroad as a beneficial opportunity for their children to experience life and cultures abroad.

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Outdated & Ageing Leaders Holding Back Private Varsities In Malaysia?

Ministry of higher education Malaysia

(Source: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/)

Currently, only about 15% of Vice-Chancellors and 8% of Deputies have significant and relevant overseas management experience

A new study conducted by The Penang Institute analyzing the latest data from 2013 by Malaysia’s Ministry of Education found that poor leadership from the top management may be the cause of financial pressure and poor overall quality outcomes seen at private institutions in Malaysia.

The research examined publicly-available data and studied the diversity of top management teams in Malaysia’s private higher education institutions (HEIs) and found them to share disproportionately high similarities in terms of background, demographics and experience.

Penang Institute General Manager and Serdang MP, Ong Kian Ming stated that “[the] data showed that around 90% of Malaysian Vice-Chancellors were men and only 20% of their Deputy Vice-Chancellors were women.” Age was also highly concentrated – 56% of Vice-Chancellors aged sixty years old & 32% in their fifties – showing close to nine out of 10 being aged in their fifties and above. What is even more worrying is that, the next generation were also close to the end of their careers. Almost half (47%) of Deputy Vice-Chancellors were in their sixties with 34% in their fifties. Read more

THE 2015 Rankings Show Japan University Still ‘King of the Mountain’

the-wur-logo-world-rankings

 

The Times Higher Education Asia University Rankings 2015 released last week placed University of Tokyo at the number one spot this year, for the third year in a row. National University of Singapore finished second, and the University of Hong Kong came in third.

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Although the University of Tokyo remains Asia’s number one institution, Japan slips to second place with 19 representatives, down from 20 last year. On the other hand, China has toppled Japan to be the continent’s higher education powerhouse, with 21 universities from the Chinese mainland enter the top 100 of the rankings. Peking University earns the fourth spot among top Asian universities, while Tsinghua University closely follows the former at fifth place.

China’s special administrative regions also performwell, with six universities from Hong Kong (two in the top 10) and one from Macao represented in the top 50.

“The shift in power towards China takes place against a backdrop of investment in research and development while Japan wrestles with cuts as a result of its crippling level of public debt,” Times Higher Education stated on its website.

South Korea is the third-strongest nation in the rankings with 13 representatives, down from 14 last year. Its leading Seoul National University is sixth, down two places, and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) is in eighth. Although Pohang University of Science and Technology dropped out of the top 10 this year, Sungkyunkwan University jumped 11 places to 16th.

Asia is expected to be the next global higher education superpower, after North America and Europe. As Allan E. Goodman, president of the Institute of International Education, states in Asia: The Next Higher Education Superpower?, “Governments in Asia see internationalisation of their colleges and universities as a means to capitalise on rapid globalisation and remain competitive in the global marketplace. Their progress in these regards will define Asia’s future involvement with the world and possibly redefine the way the world engages in higher education.”

On the other hand, six Turkish universities take places in the top 50, making Turkey the most successful representative in the Middle East. Middle East Technical University (METU), its best performer, leaps 17 places to 12th. According to THE, this “stunning progress” is “largely attributable to its outstanding research impact”.

Bothwell said: “[Among] the top eight universities for citations, five of these are in Turkey, up from two last year. Bogazici University has taken 14th position, up from joint 19th, and new entrant Sabanci University almost made the top 20.

Unfortunately, no Malaysian university was able to meet the international standard this year. The last time a Malaysian varsity made the cut was in 2013 when Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia was ranked at the 87th place.

 

Note: The Asia rankings use 13 performance indicators to compare each university against its core missions of teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.

Singapore Institution Remain Asia’s Top University According To The 2015 QS Asia University Rankings

(Source: qs.mediaroom.com)

(Source: qs.mediaroom.com)

National University of Singapore once again takes the number one spot, beating The University of Hong Kong and KAIST in the 2015 QS University Rankings: Asia published today. This is the second year in a row that NUS has ranked number one. The Nanyang Technological University added another feather to the lion city’s cap by rising three rungs to fourth this year.

 

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(Source: QS University Rankings: Asia 2015)

 

On the other hand, the Chinese has 25 institutions among the top 100 in Asia, far outstripping its big neighbour – India with 9. Peking University steps into the top seventh this year while Tsinghua University rises from 14th to 11th.

“The majority of the ranked Chinese institutions are increasing their research output, spurred by the impressive and sustained level of public and private investment, second only to the US. However, the country’s leading universities are still lagging behind in terms of research citation numbers, which reveal the impact of the research they produce,” said Ben Sowter, head of research at QS.

Addressing India’s mediocre ranking performances, Sowter explained that the indian universities had not received funding on the scale enjoyed by their Chinese counterparts.

In Malaysia, the University of Malaya (UM) has successfully broken into the top 30 list. The nation’s oldest university was 20 spots ahead of Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), which took the 49th place, up from 57th place a year earlier. Sowter highlighted that Malaysia’s focus on education and innovation is reflected in the improvements in ranking among the country’s top universities.

The other Asian countries featured in the top 300 are: Thailand with 11 universities, Pakistan with 10 universities, both Hong Kong and Indonesia with 7 universities respectively, Philippines with 4 universities, Bangladesh with 2 universities, Sri Lanka, Brunei, Vietnam and Macau with 1 university each.

 

Note: The QS Asia University Rankings grades the top 300 tertiary education institutions in Asia on nine key performance indicators, including academic reputation (30%), employer reputation (10%), faculty/student ratio (20%), citations per paper (15%), papers per faculty (15%), proportion of international faculty (2.5%) and students (2.5%), and the proportion of inbound (2.5%) and outbound exchange students (2.5%).

Malaysia’s Education Blueprint

With the announcement of the upcoming 11th Malaysia Plan 2015 today, we’re excited to see what the Malaysian government has planned in its commitment to being a world-class economy – and leading regional education hub. Just last month, Malaysia’s higher education sector received a boost with the launch of The Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 – 2025 (Higher Education). This landmark blueprint was launched in Kuala Lumpur by Malaysia’s Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Mohammad Najib bin Tun Abdul Razak, where he emphasised three critical themes, known as the “Three B’s”:

  • Bakat
    Focus on offering world-class quality higher education to attract international students and nurture domestic talent
  • Benchmark
    Vision for Malaysia to be in the top one-third of global leading destinations for higher education and to increase the rankings of local universities in world rankings
  • Balance
    Graduates of Malaysian universities to achieve ideal balance of being equipped with skills (ilmu) and good morals (akhlak), to be put into practice

 

New times, new priorities

Dr. Zaini Ujang

(Source: photos.utm.my)

Speaking on the creation of the blueprint which took two years to complete, Education Ministry Secretary General II Dato’ Seri Ir Dr. Zaini Ujang said that the publication was the result of 10,500 people collectively represented by stakeholders, school administrators, unions, alumni and also students with 14 chapter-writing teams and 20 lead authors. Replacing the previous blueprint done in 2006, The Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 – 2025 (Higher Education) reflects the changes that have since passed and therefore needed to be updated (including changing the target to host 250,00 by 2025, instead of 200,000 by 2020). Professor Zaini continued,

“[The] blueprint is crucial to outline what is new in higher education. We didn’t want to use what we planned back in 2006 because much time has passed since then. There have been a lot of new developments and so we [needed] to update our strategies. [For example,] many people [now] learn through mobile devices. Students already have this ‘machine’ – their handphones. So, we have to leverage on it.”

The blueprint also highlighted the challenges Malaysia’s higher education system faces with regard to domestic and global labour markets that must be overcome including:
1) Graduates with poor English-language proficiency and lacking in critical thinking and communication skills
2) Lack of links and support between academia and industry, especially in research & development and commercialisation
3) Systemic shortcomings that hamper the efficiency and financial sustainability of the system

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Four Predictions For Digital Marketing In 2015

With 2015 almost upon us, it is high time that we turned our minds to predicting how digital marketing will continue to take shape in the year ahead. Digital marketing – search, social media, mobile, content marketing, and more – has certainly held our attention this year. Prospective students and potential partners are relying ever more on digital channels, and 2014 has in some respects been an interesting turning point in how many of us think about the place of digital in the overall marketing mix.

[Originally published on ICEF at http://monitor.icef.com/2014/11/four-predictions-digital-marketing-2015/ ]

We believe that digital will take hold to an even greater degree in 2015 and we’re not alone. Forbes published a thought-provoking article earlier this month entitled, “6 predictions about the state of digital marketing in 2015.” We’ve been reflecting on it for a few days now and have reframed their six original predictions into the four that we think will have the greatest impact on international student recruitment marketing.

Content is (still) king

Forbes gathered responses from 20 experienced digital marketing experts to frame their predictions, and the first one they landed on was that content will be more important than ever in 2015. “As Google continues to get better at connecting related search queries, long, in-depth content will become more of a trend,” said Danny Tran, online marketing manager at digital marketer QuinStreet.

Adds Venchito Tampon, content marketer with Digital Philippines, “Content will make it easy for new and existing customers to locate and use the best products and services they intend to look for in various channels… Educating the target audience will now become the top selling point of many brands from whatever industry they are in.”

We’ve had a lot to say about content marketing over the last year or so. And it seems clear that an increasing emphasis on search optimisation, competitive positioning, and meeting the expansive information requirements of prospective students will continue to encourage institutions and schools to invest heavily in quality, original content.

In just one notable example, ILAC, an award-winning Canadian language school, has gone so far as to establish its own radio station, providing English language learning content along with music programming and a related series of podcasts and other rich content.

 

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As the ILAC example illustrates, the point of content marketing is to promote the brand, and its products and services, by offering content that is informative or entertaining for the user. By providing something of value, the advertiser earns a share of the prospect’s attention and, in the best case, encourages them to engage with the brand.

Internet users have become more cynical and ad-savvy, with interruptions to their online experiences unlikely to be rewarded and more likely to be ignored,” notes a recent post on the Euromonitor International blog. “The solution increasingly rolled out by marketers and online services is [content marketing].”

All together now

Forbes’ second prediction is that marketing channels – digital and non-digital – will become increasing integrated in 2015. “Content creation, search optimisation and social media will be less siloed as specific departments and treated more like skills that exist across the organisation,” says Lee Odden, CEO of TopRank Online Marketing.

This is an important point and one that we wager many institutions and schools have begun to bump up against in 2014. Marketing and IT are distinctly separate functions and departments in many organisations. There might be a talented SEO specialist lurking within the marketing team but how connected is he or she to important IT processes or even decision-making or planning around web content?

This is a potentially culturally and structurally disruptive idea for many organisations but given the importance of digital marketing today, we may have reached the point where those traditional walls between marketing and IT need to be broken down, for the sake of providing a highly integrated experience for prospects across devices, channels, and media. And, more to the point, for the sake of driving conversions across an expanding range of both digital and non-digital touch points.

More mobile than ever

At the start of this year, we said that marketers will focus on mobile more than ever before in 2014. And we are saying it again for 2015.

Forbes has a broader view of mobile trends for 2015 and points to important upcoming developments in advanced analytic for mobile as well as the rapidly expanding “wearable” mobile category (e.g., smart watches, fitness bands).

But if we bring this back more squarely to international student recruitment, the implications of the mobile behaviours that established themselves over 2013 and 2014 are inescapable for education marketers.

Tracking studies indicate that 30% of international prospects primarily access the web via a mobile device, and as much as 71% have at least looked at a university website on a smartphone or tablet. These numbers naturally vary by market to some extent. But in China, for example, 81% of Internet users (in the world’s largest source market for international students) reach the web via a mobile device.

In other words, if you have not delivered a truly outstanding mobile experience to prospective students in 2014 – especially one that is closely linked to key conversion processes for inquiries and admissions – you really will want to take steps to do so in 2015. There are simply too many prospective students that now rely on the mobile web for some or all of their education search and application experience.

Data for breakfast

The final Forbes prediction that we will highlight here is their expectation that marketing campaigns will be more data-driven in 2015. This means many things to many people but essentially it anticipates a renewed emphasis on measuring campaign performance and adapting or refining the marketing effort on an ongoing basis and in light of evidence-based findings.

“2015 will be the year of data-driven marketing,” says Alex Harris, a conversion optimisation consultant with AlexDesigns.com. “All design, advertising and social media will be focused on driving measurable results using cutting edge tracking and predictive analytic. Websites will focus more on optimising conversion rates than increasing website traffic.”

This rings true to us. We have for some years now seen a lot of emphasis on high-level web statistics, such as user visits or page views. Similarly, it is easy to measure campaign success against social sharing activity or Facebook likes. Increasingly, however, with the pressure building to drive to key business goals we expect that emphasis will shift to measuring the effectiveness of the marketing effort against real business outcomes. In an international student recruitment context, that means inquiries generated, applications received, students enrolled, and, ultimately, retention levels and graduation rates.

Safe to say that this is a subject we will return to regularly in 2015, along with the other early predictions we have explored today.

 

How To Create An International Student Recruitment Action Plan

Worldwide student mobility has seen steady growth over the past several years and shows no signs of slowing down any time soon – in fact, OECD’s Education at a Glance 2013 report projects international mobility to nearly double to 8.5 million students by 2025. The result has been intensifying competition, particularly among English-speaking colleges and universities, seeking the rewards of increasing and diversifying their international student populations. In this time of budget cuts and slowing domestic enrollment, internationalization has transformed from desirable bonus into institutional imperative, but achieving such goals is no straightforward task and resource efficiency is increasingly a necessity. – See more at: http://www.higher-education-marketing.com/blog/international-student-action-plan#sthash.P0cM2sRh.dpuf

While many admissions professionals continue to travel to distant corners of the world for uncertain returns, there is a growing understanding that emerging digital marketing techniques can deliver more effective results for far less of an investment. By embracing these new mediums, colleges can better control their communications and branding, reducing reliance on external agents while developing more flexible and customized management of the admissions process. Implementing these types of initiatives successfully requires a willingness to adapt to rapidly shifting student engagement expectations, understanding not only the continuous advances in available technological tools but the cultural nuances of various target markets. No small challenge!

Going global takes more than just talking the talk – many higher ed institutions passively court foreign students with little more than an international page on their website and perhaps some “one-size-fits-all” attempts at social media or PPC ads in other markets. While this might be enough for super-brands like Harvard, the vast majority of colleges and universities with international enrollment increases cite active recruitment as the reason for their success.

Creating a Culture of Internationalization

Making internationalization a true priority means taking a longer term, bigger picture view of its role in enhancing your institution. More and more universities are publicly declaring internationalization a key component of future success, embedded in strategic plans or elaborated upon in high level documents.

Example: The University of Calgary highlights internationalization as a “key strategic priority” in their pursuit of becoming “a global intellectual hub”, according to their recent International Strategy document. The 24-page report highlights their commitment to these goals by illustrating current activity, tangible targets and strategic goals, namely:

Increase diversity of our campus communities Improve global and cross-cultural competencies within our campus communities Enhance opportunities for international collaborations and partnerships in research and education Leverage our unique areas of expertise to engage in international development

These kinds of documents serve to galvanize key decision makers while providing a shared reference for different stakeholder groups to further the school’s mission.

Expanding strategic international partnerships, research collaborations, exchange and study abroad programs, and alumni relations can greatly enhance a university’s educational capabilities, student opportunities and participation, brand reputation and much more. Colleges can strive to improve the experiences of incoming international students, thus growing valuable word-of-mouth referrals among other benefits, by broadening orientation services and retention tactics. Promoting internationalization means providing the pathways for growth, including resources for increasingly culturally diverse students (and staff) on campus to learn from each other.

These are all long-term projects demanding visionary leadership – but what can schools do right now for more immediate results?

Feeling out Markets with Paid Search

International strategic enrollment management begins with establishing and communicating clear goals for the number and types of students desired, leveraging enrollment data to forecast trends and develop realistic targets. Focus initial efforts by choosing markets with the best potential for your institution – likely typical leading countries of origin (China, India, South Korea) but sometimes smaller nations that have an established presence at your school. Also consider focusing marketing efforts according to preferred academic discipline and degree type.

Unique cultural and language considerations add an extra layer of complexity when going global – choosing appropriate keywords is not simply a matter of direct translation. Pay-Per-Click (PPC) advertising is a tremendously cost-effective method of revealing insights about potential markets, since expense is only incurred when prospects actually click your link. It is a great way to learn which search terms are popular and which ads better convert, letting you see which combinations of keywords and messaging are more effective in a particular market. For an in-depth look at PPC for international student recruitment, our previous blog on the subject is an excellent starting point.

Google AdWords has a free Keyword Planner tool for searching keyword and ad group ideas, but keep in mind that Google isn’t the most popular search engine in several important source countries. Before launching a PPC campaign, it is essential that ad copy fits the requirements for the applicable platform, landing pages have been created on your website and analytics tracking has been established. Landing pages must meet expectations created by the ad copy and concisely convince prospects to take the next steps, such as completing an application or “request information” form.

International Search and Mobile Trends

Recent data analysis from Google shows a continuous increase in education-related search volumes, confirming that the student decision journey has indeed moved online. Non-branded search queries by prospective students uncertain of which school they wish to attend are rising at a faster rate. Google’s internal tracking revealed that queries including geo-specific keywords generated strong click-through conversions. Increasing specificity by promoting particular degree and academic programs in specific locations is recommended for better results.

Of course, going mobile has been another top priority for higher education marketing. Optimizing for mobile-device usage is even more important for international recruitment, since a majority of users in several source countries are mobile-exclusive. A negative mobile experience on your website is enough for 35% of prospects to move on to the next potential college on their list, according to internal Google research. Make sure you have your most important bases covered when developing for task-driven mobile searchers – top selling points of your school, programs and admission info, videos and application forms are among the most popular features to include. Shorter forms are far more likely to convert. International students will also want to know things like financial and study permit details.

Internationalizing Websites

One of the biggest challenges of internationalization is developing your website to appeal to multiple markets and languages. Although many options will technically work, using a top level folder on the same domain as your other content (rather than a subdomain or microsite) lets you develop a customized experience with fully translated paths while enhancing your SEO. Keep in mind that search engines won’t give your pages the same value if they think it’s only an auto-translation (or if content is out of date), and to avoid the issue of duplicate content you must create the proper links between translated content to alert them if it’s a translation. Alternate hreflang link tags let search engines know how content should be prioritized.

Right-to-left languages like Arabic require the appropriate fonts and additional “rtl” tags at the top level block element. Content using Chinese characters and other logographic languages presents the additional challenge of modifying the page layout and structure to accommodate the unique condensed properties. While providing content in multiple languages can be complex, it can go a long way to effectively communicating with foreign prospective students and, perhaps even more so, their parents. Ensure that users can easily navigate between available translations – the clearest way is to prominently display the language name written in that language at the top of the webpage. Even if you have multiple international websites, avoid auto-directing based on a user’s IP address as it will irritate prospects and inhibit Google’s crawlers from discovering your sites.

Content and Social Media Considerations

When developing any content for international audiences, it is vital to understand your target market as much as possible, including the local language (in the way that prospects actually speak), cultural norms and expectations, and priorities in education search. Try using student assistants to help develop or translate content and always test with various groups to ensure that messaging is clear.

Social media can be a valuable tool for discovering more about prospect groups through online conversations, informal surveys and the types of posts that receive greater interaction. Communication on these networks can serve to filter unqualified prospects and reveal insights about language proficiency, interests and your brand perception. It is an opportunity to showcase different sides of your institution and reinforce alumni successes.

International Lead Conversion

It is important that inquiries from all prospects, domestic or international, are addressed effectively and promptly. Students expect a quick email response, even if it is initially an auto-response with some helpful links – Hotcourses Abroad found that if given two similar universities, students from China, India, Thailand, Vietnam and Singapore would choose the one that responded fastest. Prospects prefer personalized responses signed by a staff member they can continue correspondence with.

Best practices:

Address the student by name Answer the question personally and in detail Provide helpful additional information, including social media and relevant links

Email drip marketing campaigns can efficiently track and manage large quantities of inquiries for the entire student life cycle, automatically triggering customized messages based on specific conditions that provide effective resources while minimizing staff requirements. Instead of leaving it up to prospects to continue correspondence as many colleges do, be persistent and frequent in your responses, varying the types of follow-up messaging and addressing potential concerns with multimedia supplemental information to increase the odds of making a connection.

Virtual Campus Tours and Hangouts

A campus tour is a big part of most students’ decision processes, providing the opportunity for them to envision if they can really spend their next four years there. International students rarely have the luxury of visiting a prospective campus ahead of enrollment but virtual tours can help bridge the gap, emphasizing a school’s strongest features and providing a glimpse of campus life. Google Maps Street View also offers interior virtual tours of some schools and a few US-based universities are already developing tours using new Oculus Rift virtual reality technology.

To get better personalized interaction despite the distance, more colleges and universities are adopting web-conferencing via easily accessible tools like Google Hangouts. These digital face-to-face tools not only allow admissions personnel to engage directly with international students, but also clarify solutions using whiteboards, share documents or slideshares, and guide prospects through relevant webpages via co-browsing. To make the most of these opportunities, school personnel should develop and rehearse a script to work from and test all equipment many times beforehand.

More International Recruitment Ideas

Digital marketing is advancing all the time, providing new tools for schools seeking a competitive edge in reaching prospects across the globe. Here are some innovative ideas for colleges and universities looking to access the world:

List with international portal sites Develop apps featuring application tips, sample lectures, campus videos/pictures English-language training (online modules and/or collaborations with other training facilities) or online language exchange Reach out to international alumni (through internal networks or tools like LinkedIn) to support recruitment activities

Whichever initiatives you pursue, improving your international student recruitment can best be accomplished when you have a thorough and accurate picture of your web activity. When managing several social media and other student marketing channels covering various markets, it becomes even more essential to have a clear system to reveal what is working where and monitor your ongoing reputation – software and student assistants can help. Google Analytics can help you to understand your student mix and top source countries so you can track and monitor your progress while effectively segmenting and customizing communications.

For colleges and universities seeking to move from passive to active international recruitment, Higher Education Marketing has created the new International Recruitment Action Plan with two service packages designed to generate measurable ROI improvements with immediate results.

What is your biggest international student recruitment challenge?

Five Ways Higher Education Marketing Will Change in 10 Years

marketing trends

(Source: www.oneproductions.com)

Initially published on http://www.evolllution.com/. It is no secret that higher education is more competitive than ever. The most competitive institutions frantically try to climb over one another to be the first to connect with a potential student. And it isn’t just the for-profits either. Many non-profit institutions are beefing up their advertising budgets and marketing departments in order to hold onto their corner of the market. Some non-profits are dedicating more than 20 percent of their annual revenues to drive their message to the masses. The force behind these changes is the ever-growing expectations of the student. Students want a program that is customized to fit their needs. Thanks to growing competition, they are often able to find it. With massive open online courses (MOOCs) entering the picture at a rapid pace, the need to customize the experience from website visit to graduation will skyrocket in the next decade.

The increasing variety of approaches to learning, combined with the vast array of student preferences, means institutions will need to respond with programmatic solutions and new services. However, it is crucial for students to clearly understand how these options align with their unique situations. Effective marketing will provide this, and for many non-profit institutions, this reality will mean a drastic overhaul of their current operations. Some of the changes will include:

 

1. “Post-click” personalization

Any highly competitive institution is likely using Constituent Relationship Management technology to send personalized communication to those with inquiries. Unfortunately, this personalization doesn’t often go beyond the level of program of interest. But we now have web analytics available to determine and anticipate the needs of prospective students before they even fill out the inquiry form. This means a shift from post-inquiry personalization to post-click personalization. Beyond this, we must anticipate our relevant audiences and align communication with their behavior before they even reach our website. Once they reach the website, that experience needs to be customized to the extent that it adjusts to their needs.

2. Real-time, data-informed decision making

The days of monthly reviews of campaign results to determine marketing resource allocation are over. Moving forward, marketing departments must have the technology and expertise in place to harness the data captured and pivot ongoing activities based on solid data analysis. This requires sophisticated technology, air-tight integration between systems, constant data analysis and reporting and activity-based logic that automatically adjusts the shopping experience as the prospective student advances through the process of researching the institution. Marketing departments must expand their analytical capabilities and align these functions with outreach and admissions activities.

3. Mobile-ready marketing

Postcards, viewbooks and mailings in general are going the way of the print newspaper. Marketers have to plan their communications to play nicely with mobile devices. This is true today, but heading into the future, it will be essential. Rather than viewing mobile as a nice-to-have feature for certain communication, marketers will need to develop all interactive elements to be fully functional on a variety of mobile devices throughout both the shopping and enrollment experiences.

4. Marketing through graduation

As completion rates and return on educational investment become more transparent, the separation between pre-enrollment communication and the post-enrollment student experience must be eliminated. Valuable data captured prior to enrollment can help drive relevant communication and services to students as they work to completion. On the flip side, student data has the potential to guide marketing decisions in a variety of ways. Systems, processes and staff will need to align effectively to produce information that can be utilized throughout the cycle. Marketing to the point of enrollment will need to shift to marketing to the point of graduation.

5. Know what you don’t know

Sometimes the higher education mentality of being steeped in tradition can carry into our marketing and related technology management. The result is a foundation of outdated practices and systems unable to support the agility that current marketing practices require. Moving forward, staying competitive will require an ability to quickly implement and pivot new approaches to outreach and communications. Rather than building upon an existing infrastructure that may have limited versatility, it is important that institutions look to marketing and technology solution providers with focused expertise to develop a framework of technology and an understanding of current best practices in their respective areas. This way, schools don’t start from scratch with new initiatives and end up implementing when it is simply too late. Some of the most important areas to avoid “do-it-yourself” approaches include marketing communication systems, website development and mobile content creation. However, the gaps are unique for every institution and should be handled as such.

The bottom line for the future of higher education marketing is: the utilization of data down to a granular level is vital. It is through the application of data to ongoing decision making that we are able to truly listen to our future and current students and respond to their needs. While these approaches may be new to higher education, they have been practiced and optimized by other industries for years. It is important that institutions look to the expertise of outside industries to hone their ability to execute more sophisticated approaches to marketing that will ultimately provide a more relevant, cohesive and informative experience for the future student. The result will be success both for the institution and the student.

Most Popular Higher Education Courses Among Asian Students

About easyuni.com: easyuni.com is an education portal, which allows students to search, compare and apply to various universities around the world. The portal has over 1800 universities from 22 different countries. Over 1 million students use easyuni.com to choose the right university/college & ensure a better future for themselves. Right now easyuni.com is the most popular educational portal in the South East Asian region enjoying top positions in Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, Mauritius, Sri Lanka and Singapore.

Making it easier for international and local students to find the most suitable universities online, ‘easyuni.com’ has emerged as the most popular higher education portal in South East Asia. Since its launch students have spent more than 3,100,000 minutes on this website to find a dream university for themselves. The portal is providing a comprehensive platform to higher education institutions to promote themselves to students from all over the world as the portal attracts students from 202 countries worldwide.

As part of its efforts to empower institutions with valuable insights, easyuni has released data, based on the behaviour of over a million students on its portal, highlighting the most popular subjects with a breakdown of countries. After analyzing this data Education institutes will be able to develop tailored campaigns for each subject targeting different countries. For instance, students from Indonesia are highly interested in Business Management compared to Nigerian students, who see the future in Accounting and Finance-related courses.

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The portal is gaining massive popularity in countries like Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, Singapore, Australia, Brunei along with Malaysia. easyuni.com, not only provides information about universities and courses but also provides advice about various related topics like cost of living, visa requirements, university rankings, employment opportunities, scholarships, tips on enhancing student life, student accommodation and student reviews.